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Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Episode 1: Introducing the Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Podcast with Shelley and Todd

In Episode 1 of Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments, Cherise had the opportunity to chat with Shelley Landes and Todd Laderach from Roche Diabetes Care Customer Marketing team about peer support, new strategy and more. Show Notes Get to know Shelley and Todd from the Customer Marketing Team Evolution of Roche Diabetes Care US social media content and engagement The motivation behind the Inspiration Exchange Importance of peer support and why Roche Diabetes Care US is hyper-focused on peer connections and resources What’s next for Roche Diabetes Care US social...

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Man at laptop drinking coffee and looking pensively towards a bright future

Insulin? A pump? What's next for your diabetes treatment?

Life with diabetes is a lot of things, but it's never boring. The minute you think you've got it all down, something changes. Since many of us tend to resist change, and a change in your self-care routine can be downright scary, here's some food for thought. What's on your mind? Write it down. Learning new techniques? The possibility of lows? Being connected all the time? Needles? These ideas can be overwhelming when you're awake at 3am and staring at the ceiling. But written down on paper (or a screen), they become much more manageable. And once you know the questions, you can get...

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Low blood glucose warning signs - Infographic

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) symptoms and treatment

You may recognize the feeling—feeling hungry, dizzy, sweaty or just a little bit "off." These signs of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, mean it's time to take action. What causes low blood sugar? For most people, low blood glucose refers to anything below 70 mg/dL, although your number may be different.1 Low blood glucose can be caused by taking too much medication, not having enough to eat or exercising. Don't be too hard on yourself, though. Just focus on getting your blood sugar back in range, then consider what might have caused it to help prevent it next time. Low blood sugar...

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Sick man wrapped in scarf drinking tea while laying under his bed covers and feeling his temple

Down with the flu? Blood sugar running high? Know when it's time to call the doctor.

Have you ever hesitated to call the doctor, wondering if a situation truly merited the interruption? Here's a good rule of thumb: If you're wondering whether you should call, just call. And if you think the situation may be an emergency, don't question it. Give any necessary treatment for a low and call 911.1 For people who use insulin to manage diabetes, illness or especially high or low blood sugar can lead to other problems, so it's best to get your healthcare team involved quickly. Talk to your healthcare providers for more specific direction, but they'll probably want...

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Certified diabetes educator discusses treatment with couple via laptop

What can a diabetes educator do for you?

There are many people on your healthcare team—including yourself—but there's one person who can give you hands-on advice that you can start using immediately. We're talking about a diabetes educator. If you've never met with one, or if it's been a while, here's an overview of everything they can do for you. A diabetes educator can answer medical questions about diabetes, including helping you learn how to use your blood glucose meter or medication. They'll help you figure out how food and activity affect your blood sugar, as well as how to deal with things like stress or depression. Expect ...

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Young female physician discusses results with young female patient

What is LADA or type 1.5 diabetes?

If you're active in online diabetes forums and social media, you've probably come across prominent community members with a third type of diabetes. It's known as type 1.5 diabetes or LADA (which stands for "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults"). Similar to type 1, LADA is an autoimmune response—the body attacks the beta cells in the pancreas that are responsible for producing insulin. However, LADA generally affects people over age 30, and they don't tend to require additional insulin until months or years after diagnosis.1 Many people with LADA are initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. In fact,...

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Concerned mother presses her forehead against her worried son's forehead as they clasp hands

For parents of kids with type 1 diabetes, "worry" is an understatement

Every parent worries. But for parents of kids with type 1 diabetes (T1D), the word "worry" may not go far enough. Lisa O. finds the struggle for balance—especially when away from her son—all too real. "As a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, I feel it's my job to make sure my son is healthy, even if I'm not with him. It's a constant worry," said Lisa. Lisa's experience isn't unique. In fact, a recent survey reveals that parents of T1D children experience a range of issues—54% experienced tension headaches, 40% reported anxiety attacks, 37% experienced lack of concentration and 32% said they'd lost their temper with their...

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A child's hand and an adult's hand, both painted in bright colors along each finger with a smiley face on the palms

Alternate site testing

  Whether testing alternate sites or at the fingertip, try the Accu-Chek® FastClix lancing device—the only 1-click lancing device with a drum. Some blood glucose meters allow you to use a blood sample from a nonfingertip or alternate site such as your palm, forearm or upper arm.1 Because the skin of these areas contains fewer nerves than the fingertip, alternate site testing may be more...

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Stressed woman with coffee holds hand to her head as she looks out upon a cold, dark night

Don't know about DKA?

No one wants to have high blood sugar—you'd rather feel your best. But there's even more to it. When your blood sugar is high, your body can't move the large amount of glucose in the blood into your cells. Instead, your body uses more fat for fuel. And when fat is burned in this way, ketones are formed. Any time your blood sugar is over 240, you should immediately use a ketone test strip to check your urine.1 Ketones make the blood acidic, making you feel ill and possibly leading to diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA). DKA is a serious medical condition that causes nausea and vomiting. With vomiting can come...

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