Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.
hamburger overlay
Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Podcast logo

Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Episode 1: Introducing the Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Podcast with Shelley and Todd

In Episode 1 of Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments, Cherise had the opportunity to chat with Shelley Landes and Todd Laderach from Roche Diabetes Care Customer Marketing team about peer support, new strategy and more. Show Notes Get to know Shelley and Todd...

Read More

Refine Results

Male physician discusses treatment options with female patient

Reducing the pain of blood sugar checks

  When checking blood sugar, try the Accu-Chek® FastClix lancing device—designed for comfort. Nobody gets excited about pricking their fingertip. In fact, studies have shown that it's one of the main reasons people refrain from regularly checking their blood glucose.1,2 So how can you make this less of a hurdle in your self-care? Selecting a less-painful lancing device...

Read More
Seated man with a strained look on his face grabs questioningly at his knee while his wife places a hand on his shoulder

Normal aches and pains? Or time to see the doctor?

Nobody wants to call the doctor for every little thing—but we know that treatments for diabetes-related health problems are more effective if you start early. So when should you see your doctor? Here are a few guidelines: Pain, numbness, weakness or tingling—especially in the hands, feet, arms or legs: Even if it seems insignificant, these feelings can be a sign of early nerve damage. If that's the case, as nerves become more damaged, the symptoms can get worse.1 Changes in your health: If you feel lightheaded after standing...

Read More
Young woman writes studiously in a notebook in a computer lab

Structured blood glucose testing

Structured testing supports your routine or daily testing by giving you deeper, more targeted data to work from. It can help you determine if you're in a safe range and problem-solve around how the things you do are connected to your blood sugar. You simply perform additional tests over a short period at specific times of day. Structured testing tools can help you: Discover how to best use your numbers See how certain activities can affect on your blood sugar levels Problem-solve around highs and lows Identify blood sugar patterns Work with your healthcare...

Read More
Young male physician discusses results with young male patient

6 steps to building a better doctor's visit

How long do you spend with your doctor these days? 10 minutes? 15? Even though your time is crunched, there are things you can do to forge a more collaborative relationship, have more productive conversations and make every second count. 1. Plan a day or two ahead. Send your numbers in advance by e-mail or the route your doctor prefers. Call out anything you notice that's out of the ordinary. Then bring a copy of everything you send with you, just in case. Your doctor may only take a glance before you meet, but you'll get the wheels turning for a more fruitful appointment. 2. Collect your...

Read More
Man at laptop drinking coffee and looking pensively towards a bright future

Insulin? A pump? What's next for your diabetes treatment?

Life with diabetes is a lot of things, but it's never boring. The minute you think you've got it all down, something changes. Since many of us tend to resist change, and a change in your self-care routine can be downright scary, here's some food for thought. What's on your mind? Write it down. Learning new techniques? The possibility of lows? Being connected all the time? Needles? These ideas can be overwhelming when you're awake at 3am and staring at the ceiling. But written down on paper (or a screen), they become much more manageable. And once you know the questions, you can get...

Read More
Woman explaining how to use a blood glucose meter to an attentive young man

Introduction to self-monitoring blood glucose

The tiny drop of blood you see on your test strip contains a wealth of information. You can use this to help you within the blood glucose target ranges recommended by your healthcare provider, as well as your own lifestyle goals.1 Blood sugar target ranges In general, the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommended blood sugar levels are: Between 80 and 130 mg/dL before meals2 Less than 180 mg/dL after meals2 Your range is yours alone—based on your health, age, level of activity and other factors. And remember that...

Read More
Low blood glucose warning signs - Infographic

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) symptoms and treatment

You may recognize the feeling—feeling hungry, dizzy, sweaty or just a little bit "off." These signs of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, mean it's time to take action. What causes low blood sugar? For most people, low blood glucose refers to anything below 70 mg/dL, although your number may be different.1 Low blood glucose can be caused by taking too much medication, not having enough to eat or exercising. Don't be too hard on yourself, though. Just focus on getting your blood sugar back in range, then consider what might have caused it to help prevent it next time. Low blood sugar...

Read More
Sick man wrapped in scarf drinking tea while laying under his bed covers and feeling his temple

Down with the flu? Blood sugar running high? Know when it's time to call the doctor.

Have you ever hesitated to call the doctor, wondering if a situation truly merited the interruption? Here's a good rule of thumb: If you're wondering whether you should call, just call. And if you think the situation may be an emergency, don't question it. Give any necessary treatment for a low and call 911.1 For people who use insulin to manage diabetes, illness or especially high or low blood sugar can lead to other problems, so it's best to get your healthcare team involved quickly. Talk to your healthcare providers for more specific direction, but they'll probably want...

Read More

Pages