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Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Episode 1: Introducing the Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Podcast with Shelley and Todd

In Episode 1 of Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments, Cherise had the opportunity to chat with Shelley Landes and Todd Laderach from Roche Diabetes Care Customer Marketing team about peer support, new strategy and more. Show Notes Get to know Shelley and Todd from the Customer Marketing Team Evolution of Roche Diabetes Care US social media content and engagement The motivation behind the Inspiration Exchange Importance of peer support and why Roche Diabetes Care US is hyper-focused on peer connections and resources What’s next for Roche Diabetes Care US social...

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Male doctor writing the word DIABETES with whiteboard marker

What is diabetes?

Simply put, diabetes is a condition that occurs when your blood glucose, or blood sugar, is too high. But how does that happen, and what does it mean? How your body creates and uses blood sugar1 When you eat, your body converts food into glucose, a type of sugar that your body uses for energy. Glucose is carried throughout your body by the blood. In order for your cells to access the glucose in your blood, insulin (a hormone created by the pancreas) has to "unlock" the cells to let the sugar in. If your body doesn't manufacture enough insulin, or doesn't use...

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Elderly physician holding clipboard and discussing results with female patient

How an insulin pump works

Like the pancreas of a person without diabetes, an insulin pump regularly releases small quantities of insulin into the body, 24 hours a day, as well as additional insulin when food is eaten. Multiple daily injection therapy aims to mirror this by providing long-acting insulin throughout the day, as well as bolus doses of fast-acting insulin at mealtimes. Insulin pump therapy takes this further, by providing a steady level of insulin, called basal insulin, at rates that better correspond to the body's needs throughout the day. At mealtimes, bolus doses of insulin can be precisely calculated...

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Couple at table eating dinner with plates of steak, broccoli, and an orange slice

A new way to manage mealtime insulin—the extended bolus

BY CHRISTIN S. DARNELL MS, RD/LDN, CDE Many people who have diabetes take insulin to manage their blood sugar, using insulin in various ways throughout the day. With an insulin pump, your body receives a steady supply of basal insulin throughout the day, and you program additional bolus doses to cover the carbohydrates in food you eat. By estimating the amount of insulin you need to balance the carbohydrate in your meal, you can keep your blood sugar from going too high after eating. You can take the dose by injection or bolus with an insulin pump—it's the same thing, just using different methods. While this...

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Concerned young man on cell phone staring incredulously at laptop screen

Are you avoiding these 10 common mistakes?

Perhaps not all the time, and maybe not all at once, but it seems like just about everyone experiences these pitfalls now and then. How about you? Thinking of BG results as "good" or "bad." If we could all just reframe the conversation to think in terms of high, low and in-range, we could be a lot less rough on ourselves. Spilling test strips. Have you ever knocked over your test strip vial and spilled test strips on the floor? The spill-resistant Accu-Chek Guide SmartPack® vial is intelligently designed to...

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Mother and father carry daughter and son upon their backs as they casually hike through a grassy field set in the woods

Considering an insulin pump?

If you're tired of daily insulin injections, an insulin pump may be a good fit for you. Even though some people worry that they don't want to be "attached" to something all of the time, many people find that the pump provides greater freedom than multiple injections each day.1 What's more, using an insulin pump has been shown to help adults and even very young children better control their blood sugar.1,2 A pump can help you enjoy:1,2 Flexible eating—Insulin is matched to the food actually eaten, rather than planning meals around insulin intake Sleeping late...

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Successfully managing diabetes in college—how Logan (and her mom) made it through the first two years

Looking forward to her junior year at Ball State University, Logan has learned a great deal about managing every aspect of her diabetes, and her mom Kelly has learned a lot about how capable her daughter really is. They took time out of their summer break to chat with us about their experience. First off, Logan, what are you studying? Logan: I'm getting a degree in psychology with a minor in criminology. My...

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6 tips for college students with diabetes (and parents, too!)

No matter how mature, how ready, how many times they've been to camp, college is often the first time a teenager is truly on their own. And even for the most self-sufficient, this can come with a few surprises. (In fact, college student Logan noted that managing everything herself was her biggest challenge.) What can you do to make things as simple as possible? Here are a few ideas. 1. Have a heart-to-heart with your roommate Let them know what low blood glucose looks like on you, how to inject glucagon if needed and that those hard...

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Mother handing an orange slice to her young son from plate laden with apple and orange slices

Insulin pumps and children

Over the past two decades, insulin pumps have become widely adopted for use in children, including toddlers and infants. In the US, nearly half of all kids with type 1 diabetes use a pump to deliver insulin.1   Is an insulin pump right for your family? Here are a few things to consider: Better blood sugar control—Insulin pump therapy has been shown to help improve A1C levels, the long-term measure of blood glucose control, compared to injections. In addition to helping them feel better day to day, this control can help prevent the long-term health problems associated with...

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