Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Acknowledging the impact of diabetes on body and mind—the new ADA Standards of Care.

Since 1988, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has updated its Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, pulling new learning into its guidance for healthcare providers.

The biggest news this year is addressing the social and emotional aspects of successful diabetes management, going so far as to say "Lifestyle management and psychosocial care are the cornerstones of diabetes management." Of course, anyone with diabetes knows that the physical challenges are just one part of the story.

We're glad to see the ADA urging healthcare professionals to look at all sides of diabetes, including mental health, what can happen to people during various life stages, and whether they have access to social support and local resources.

Still, you don't need your doctor to help you get involved in the diabetes community. Getting to know others who share your experience is empowering. That's why events such as The Diabetes UnConference (which just took place last week in Las Vegas) have become so popular. As Terri Richert, member of the Accu-Chek team, person with T1, and UnConference attendee put it, "The Diabetes UnConference brings people to together to talk about anything that's on their minds in a safe and supportive environment. The topics are chosen and moderated by the persons attending.  It's emotional and uplifting, and each time, I walk away knowing I don’t have to deal with diabetes alone."

Bottom line, if you're feeling isolated or alone, look for ways to connect—online and in the real world. It'll be good for your mindset, and ultimately, good for your overall health.

1American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2017 [position statement]. Diabetes Care. 2017;40(1): S1-S135. Available at: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/diacare/suppl/2016/12/15/40.Sup.... Accessed January 20, 2017.

Share

Filed under: