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Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Episode 1: Introducing the Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments Podcast with Shelley and Todd

In Episode 1 of Inspiration Exchange Diabetes Moments, Cherise had the opportunity to chat with Shelley Landes and Todd Laderach from Roche Diabetes Care Customer Marketing team about peer support, new strategy and more. Show Notes Get to know Shelley and Todd from the Customer Marketing Team Evolution of Roche Diabetes Care US social media content and engagement The motivation behind the Inspiration Exchange Importance of peer support and why Roche Diabetes Care US is hyper-focused on peer connections and resources What’s next for Roche Diabetes Care US social...

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Infusion set components laid out on table

Choosing the right infusion set  

BY BEVERLY FOX HAWKINS RN, MS, CDE Infusion sets are designed to carry insulin from your insulin pump to your body as comfortably and effectively as possible. There are many different designs and combinations of cannulas and tubing lengths to accommodate a variety of body types, lifestyles and activity levels. Choosing an infusion set that works for you is one of the most important aspects of successful pumping. Here are some of the options you'll want to consider. ...

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Couple dressed in vacation wear holding map and looking off expectantly in the distance

Feeling fine? It's the perfect day to create a sick day plan.

When you're feeling ill, you'd like nothing more than to lie in bed with a good book or a bad movie. Yet that's when you need to focus even more on diabetes self-care. The key to sick days with diabetes is doing all of the thinking ahead of time. That way, when you don't feel like concentrating, you can simply follow the plan.  Involve your diabetes care team in developing your sick day plan—ask them when you should call for help, how often you should check your blood glucose and ketones, what medicines to take and what to eat. At the first sign of illness Understanding how...

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Bennet's type 2 diabetes treatment tips—gleaned from caring for his type 1 kids

Bennet's been active in the diabetes online community (DOC) since the early days, when two of his four children were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. We talked to him about that experience, and how it guided his care when his own numbers began to rise. How did you first get involved in the DOC? One of my kids was diagnosed...

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Elderly physician holding folder and discussing results with elderly female patient

Insulin? But I have type 2!

BY KAREN FLANAGAN, MA, RD, CDE With type 2 diabetes, many people think, "take a pill, watch your diet and all will be well." Right? Then, out of the blue, your doctor mentioned insulin. Insulin is secreted from a healthy-functioning pancreas in response to food or stress—whenever your body needs to get glucose into your muscle cells. In doing so, it helps keep a healthy level of glucose in your blood. Without a doubt, insulin is the most natural, easiest way to keep your blood sugar in an optimal range. Still, some physicians don't recommend insulin because they think that their patients might be too scared...

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Spiral-bound notebook with diabetes written on white paper surrounded by stethoscope and blood pressure gauge

Diabetes and heart disease: They don't have to go together

You may have heard that diabetes and heart disease often go hand-in-hand. But it's also true that they don't have to. There are many things you can do to protect your heart. Before that, however, let's start by understanding why people with diabetes are often at higher risk. While diabetes on its own is a risk factor for heart disease, it appears that diabetes and other risk factors such as smoking and obesity work together to raise risk even further.1 But wait—there's good news! Taking good care of yourself—the way you deserve—can seriously reduce your risk of complications. Intensive blood sugar management...

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Elderly physician holding clipboard and discussing results with patient

Cómo medirse el nivel de azúcar en sangre

Para medirse el nivel de azúcar en la sangre, tenga a mano su glucómetro, una tira reactiva y su dispositivo de punción. Vea el siguiente video o siga los pasos que aquí se indican. Vea cómo preparar el glucómetro y la tira reactiva, pincharse el dedo con el dispositivo de punción y obtener una lectura mediante el sistema Accu-Chek® Guide.   Los pasos son parecidos para muchos glucómetros y,...

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Young woman wearing earphones jogging on treadmill next to three other women on treadmills

Cuándo medirse el nivel de azúcar en sangre

Medirse el nivel de glucosa en la sangre de acuerdo con las recomendaciones médicas puede ayudarle a identificar los efectos que en él tienen sus comidas, medicamentos y actividades. La American Diabetes Association (ADA, Asociación Estadounidense de la Diabetes) recomienda medirse periódicamente los niveles de azúcar en la sangre para ayudar a controlar la diabetes.1 Pruebas diarias o de rutina A quienes se infunden o se inyectan insulina a lo largo del día, la ADA recomienda hacerse la prueba de glucosa en la sangre varias veces al día1. Si toma otro tipo de medicamento, mídase...

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Young male physician at his computer desk discussing treatment with elderly female patient

Objetivos de la prueba de A1C

La prueba de A1C mide el porcentaje de moléculas de hemoglobina A1C del organismo que llevan adherida glucosa. La prueba se usa como medio para revisar el control de glucosa en la sangre en un lapso de pocos meses. Puede conocer más detalles en nuestro artículo La glucosa en la sangre promedio y la prueba de A1C. Una persona que no padezca de diabetes tendrá probablemente un resultado de 5.7% o menos en la prueba de A1C, lo cual significa que aproximadamente el 5% de las moléculas de hemoglobina A1C llevan adherida azúcar sanguínea.1 Sin embargo...

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